Apr. 1st, 2017

kallistii: (Default)
So this week's endeavor is to create a time-lapse video of the last snowfall that we have had here in Ottawa, and it's melting. I picked up a JVC video camera very cheap because no one wants just a 720p camera, everyone wants a 1080p! It was missing a power supply, which I bought on Amazon for $14 or so. It's got nice glass on it, and it has optical zoom! It also has HDMI out, and the ability to do time-lapse video. I am currently using it at one frame per second. It's video format is AVCHD, which is 59.94 frames per second, or just call it 60 for now. I'm not going to do the math, since it is beyond me at the moment...

Once I have it recorded, I can also speed it up using the NLE Video editor program I have decided to use called KdenLive. It's a free Linux editor that is maybe not as complex as Adobe's offering, or a couple of free to use commercial programs that run on Linux, but it seems to be fairly feature rich, at least enough for me. I then want to compose some original music for it, but I can't use the video at it's normal length, so I have to speed it up, something that KdenLive does quite easily. One of the challenges in this is to make a video that is not too long, so that you don't loose a person's interest while watching it, but at the same time, long enough to engage them. I am thinking somewhere between three and five minutes. And then I have to  compose music for that length! This is going to be an interesting challenge! But it's something to keep me from going totally crazy! :-)


PSU imageIf you read my previous posting, you will know that I picked up a 30" monitor for $40, the only problem with it is that it was missing it's power supply. There are various solutions to this ranging from $300+ to $10, but I have chosen the middle way. This PSU, pictured to the left, is  designed like a laptop power supply, and outputs 24volts at 6Amps, basically the same specs as the manufacturer's power supply. It is aimed at powering strings of LEDs for displays and such. So it should provide fairly clean power for the monitor. It is available on Amazon Canada, so I don't have to wait potentially months for delivery!  It also means that I can get a refund easily if there is a problem with the PSU. But it does raise one problem...I need to spend another ten dollars to get free shipping! :-/

I am pretty sure that once I get it, I will be modifying the monitor's plug, rather than the PSU's, since I cannot find a source for the proprietary connector the monitor uses. So I will need to find a proper female barrel connector to solder onto the monitor's wires.

And, of course, after all of this, it may not work!

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